Tag Archives: street food

Thai Thai Bangkok Street Food in Lakewood

thailandThe Cleveland area actually has a huge supply of Thai good restaurants, and though we have a few favorites, we are still looking for our go-to spot. In Thai Thai Bangkok Street Food (13735 Madison Ave, Lakewood, OH 44107) we have a worthy contender. We first came across Thai Thai at the Asiatown Night Market over the summer, where they were selling bubble tea, chicken skewers and fried noodles. We were excited to learn that they also had a bricks-and-mortar spot in Lakewood, so we decided to pop into Thai Thai for a pre-concert meal.

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The menu at Thai Thai is limited – which in this case is a good thing – the focus is on Bangkok-specific street foods instead of a more typical wide menu. The owners are from Bangkok and have taken care to bring over some of the more unique street foods  from the city. There are favorites on the menu like pad thai and pad see eiw, but also more unique dishes like Yen Ta Foe (which M actually tried as a street food in Bangkok) – a pink soup made with fermented soybean paste and roasted duck noodles with bean sprouts.

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On a Saturday night, Thai Thai was quite crowded, but the owner Kiwi was efficiently making the rounds at the table and was quite friendly with recommendations. To start, we tried the North East Sausage, ($5.50) which is homemade pork sausage made with rice and spices, as well as Tom Yum soup ($3.50), which is a sweet and sour soup with lemongrass and mushrooms. The soup was particularly delicious, and was more complex than the other Tom Yums we have tried in the past. For mains we ordered Kra Praow (bottom dish below – $9.95), spicy chicken, rice and basil; and Larb (top dish below – $9.95), a spicy chicken salad with lemongrass, red onion and cilantro.

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The mains were both delicious, with moderate spiciness, but nothing too overpowering. All of the ingredients were super-fresh, clean and simple. Thai Thai’s dishes really did remind us of the food we had in Thailand. For dessert they also had kabocha squash custard and mango sticky rice ($5 each). However, we opted for one of the many flavors of bubble tea – taro. We enjoyed the more unique dishes available at Thai Thai, and this factor helps bring a new element to the Thai food scene in the Cleveland area. We will definitely be back to Thai Thai soon!

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Fuchka / Puchka, street food of Bangladesh

When we were at the Long Island City Flea & Food Market this fall we were surprised and pleased to find a stall selling Bangladeshi food, Jhal NYC. Jhal NYC serves street food from Bangladesh including Fuchka and Jhal Muri (a puffed rice snack). Fuchka is popular around the Indian subcontinent and might be known in other areas as puchka, panipuri and golgappa.JhalNYC

Fuckha consists of a series of small crispy dough shells, topped with chickpeas and potato stew along with other garnishes, including green onions, chili peppers and cilantro. Another key aspect is that it is then topped with (or dipped in) a light tamarind water. The fuchka was a delicious mix of complex flavors, and the crispy shells perfectly complemented the soft chickpeas and potatoes. Here is a recipe from Archana’s kitchen for the dough shell and here is a recipe for the Bangladeshi-style filling; or a simplified version that has both parts of the recipe. Fuchka was such a delicious snack – we can see how it is so popular across so many different regions.

Fuchka

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Photo Tour of Borough Market in London


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englandThere is nothing we love more than a good market, and London has them in spades. Borough Market is one of the largest and oldest markets in London, and the current iconic glass and metal structure was originally built in 1851, and after additions over the years it was refurbished at the beginning of the 21st century into its current form. Though it was originally a wholesale market, Borough Market today is a mishmash of food stalls selling everything from fresh fruit to meat pies to olive oil to tapas under one roof. Though we are always fans of food from all over the world, it was especially great to see all of the local British foodstuffs available for sale, especially the cheeses. We pieced together a light meal (very reasonably priced for London) from various stalls, after wandering around and taking in all the sights and smells.

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The Magical World of Turkish Osmanlı Macunu

turkeyWe absolutely love the culture of street food in Turkey, and we were completely intrigued by Zester’s videos of the Turkish candy, Osmanlı Macunu, being made on the street. Macun (which means “paste” in Turkish) is basically a colorful sugar lollipop that comes in a variety of flavors, made to order. Each lollipop is composed of several flavors, twirled on a stick in succession and then cured by lemon. You just have to watch!

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Exploring the Camden Lock Global Food Market

united_kingdom Many visitors to London, so we are told, cap their trip with a leisurely boat ride along the Thames – a journey which, surely, will take you to some fine culinary destinations. But – and this knowledge is thanks to a trip from our well-traveled friend Robin – London also possesses a series of small navigable canals in the central and northern parts of the city. You can ride, as we did, a British longboat from the back of Paddington Station to the Camden Lock, a leisurely ride through London’s “Little Venice” that took us by grand estates, leafy parks and an assortment of floating homes and cafes. And, prize of prizes, the boat will drop you off at what may be one of our favorite food markets ever: Camden Lock Market.

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Camden Lock Market is large, with a wide range of stores, restaurants, and shops that can get very crowded and touristy. But at this end, nearest to the boat dock, you find “Global Kitchen,” which features a plethora of appealing and appetizing food stalls around a gridded series of walkways. Even at the odd hour of 3 pm, this place was jam packed (the market is open 10am-6pm most days). Our first reaction? Overwhelming. It took half an hour just to find all the options available: Japanese noodles, Argentine grilled meats, Peruvian snacks, West African meals, kielbasa, vegan wraps, paella, cookies, piadina, and more. Everything- and we mean everything- looked good!???????????????????????????????

Choices, choices. L finally opted for South African bunny chow at Boerie en Bunny (£5.5). Operated by a woman who wins the award for genuinely nicest person we have ever met, Boerie en Bunny serves South African curries and fish stews over your choice of rice or “Bunny Chow” – a hollowed out roll (bun – get it?), stuffed with your order. We went with a rich and deeply flavorful spicy goat curry, topped with yogurt and fresh cilantro – a choice that was only made after our amiable friend forced us to try all the options she had available, and then asked us to stay just to taste a her seafood stew (fantastic, and very reminiscent of a Brazilian moqueca).

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Next, we opted to reminisce about our 2011 Istanbul trip with a Turkish lahmacun at Istanbul lahmacun (£5), a pizza-esque dish topped with ground lamb. Lahmacun are a very popular street snack in Istanbul, and we had the good fortune to try a few while were there. The stall owner, from Istanbul herself (authenticity points!) was very happy to learn we enjoyed her hometown, and eager to talk about her life experiences and food in London. The good food matched the owner’s ambiability: our lahmacun was huge, covered in ground lamb, yogurt and veggies, which made for a filling and delicious main course.

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Finally, for dessert we had one dozen Dutch poffertjes (aka “Dutch Pancakes”; £3.5) from a stall of the same name. These little puffs have the appearance of mini dough UFOs or slightly flattened donut holes. The gentleman manning the stall (see photo below) was a complete pro: flipping the poffertjes in the special pan at a lightning speed with a pair of chopsticks. Of course we could not resist topping them with Nutella.

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We ate a lot of street food in London, but the Camden Lock Market was our hands-down favorite! If you are looking for cheap, good food in London you absolutely must go. You can get there by tube, but the boat is even more fun.

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A Visit to the Mercado de Antojitos in Coyoacán, Mexico City

Mexico FlagToday is Mexican Independence Day, so what better day to talk about some Mexican street food classics? While in Mexico City we enjoyed a lot of amazing street food including a quest to find the perfect tacos al pastor (post forthcoming). However, for the most delicious street food in the smallest space under a single roof, Coyoacán’s street food market, the Mercado de Antojitos, is a veritable one stop shop for low-key, delicious, authentic, friendly and cheap food.

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Part of the major draw, beyond the food of course, is the market’s location in the historical and charming Coyoacán neighborhood in Southern Mexico City. With its cobbled streets and faded mansions, you will feel like you’ve stepped into another era (before Mexico City engulfed it, it was in fact its own town). The Anotjito Market is tucked into a side street near the main square of Coyoacán. There are about a dozen stalls inside, each ringed with stools or benches. This is definitely not a touristy place, and the food is so good – and turnover so high – there isn’t much need for hawking or up-selling.  People of all ages packed the stalls, and for added liveliness, a guitar band entertained.

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We were spoiled for choice by all of the antojitos (literally “little cravings”): so what did we get? One of the most popular dishes on offer was the quesadilla, which means something different that it does in English parlance  (no cheese!). Due to their prevalence and popularity among the market patrons, we knew we had to choose a quesadilla. The quesadillas we tried were deep fried and stuffed with huitlacoche, one of our favorite Mexican flavors. Huitlacoche is technically a corn fungus, and tastes something like a truffle!

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Another popular choice for sale was pozole, a hearty stew made from hominy and pork, which was especially delicious on a somewhat dreary and rainy day. For a little Vitamin C, you can also get your fill of fresh squeezed juices in flavors like strawberry and papaya. Beyond its role in pozole and in the tortillas, corn is king at the market, and for an even purer corn experience try a thick cornmeal drink (atole) or a cup of corn kernels with epazote (esquite). The prices are also very reasonable, so you can get more than a meal’s worth for only a few dollars. A market full of street foods is potentially one of our favorite concepts – and the Mercado de Antojitos definitely did not disappoint.

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Discovering Yen Ta Foe at Win Coffee in Bangkok

Lindsay and I (now that we have revealed our real names!) were in southeast Asia in 2010, traversing around the region after a short stop-off for an academic conference in Singapore. As loyal readers know, we are big advocates for street food and small, specialty restaurants that specialize in a few items. Without painting with too broad a brush, this style is classic southeast Asian food culture, and Bangkok is no exception. 

Luckily, we made a friend. While doing some shopping and wandering around Wat Ratchabophit, we met Bee, a Bangkok native who had gone to school in North Carolina (we speak hardly any Thai, but she speaks perfect English). And she was eager to show us her favorite restaurant: Win Coffee, not far from her shop on Thanon Tanao. We’re actually not sure how to render the address, but they have a  Google Plus page.

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Win Coffee, though billed as a coffee place, had what Bee said was her favorite Yen Ta Foe in the city, a classic Thai dish made with lots of ingredients that, at least according to her, would make Americans cringe. Ingredients l fish balls, squid slices, and coagulated blood are put in a soup flavored with chilis, fish sauce, and fermented soybean paste, and topped with crispy chips like the casing for Crab Rangoon.  Eatingthaifood.com has a great description of Yen Ta Foe if you would like more detail. Though Bee suggested the dish, in Thai, to the owner, I heard the owner say back to her something about a farang – the Thai word for a foreigner.

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If there’s any point we try to make on this blog, it’s that you shouldn’t be afraid to try new things. And for me in particular, the more a local person tells me I won’t like something, the more I want to try it. And I loved the Yen Ta Foe (ordered extra Thai spicy, of course). Bangkok street food provides a thrilling mix of textures and flavors, unlocking palettes that other regional cuisines don’t. Yen Ta Foe is great at this – it’s an exciting mix of textures and flavors, and I loved it. While Win Coffee is well off the standard Bangkok tourist trail, we would encourage visitors to explore these lesser-known areas of town. Any small place that is open is going to make you happy, and Win Coffee definitely did.

On a sidenote, Bee was supposed to facebook us after we parted ways (and after she so graciously paid for our food), but we never connected. Bee, if you stumble upon this, send us an email! We’d love to head back to Thailand and try more food with you.

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A Quick Guide to Street Food in Istanbul

turkeyThe street food in Istanbul is amazing, and there is a whole lot more than Döner on offer. Though of course the ubiquitous cone of meat is available, we found some options for street food that were completely unique. When we were in Istanbul, we ate as much street food as possible, and we really enjoyed the ubiquitous culture of street stalls and carts. Here are our favorite street eats, but if you’re looking for more, Witt Hotels and Atdaa have great rundowns of the myriad different types of street food in Istanbul. We wish we were enjoying these munchies by the Bosporus right now.

Mısır – One thing we never expected to see for sale in Istanbul was something distinctly “new world” – grilled corn on the cob! Much like Mexican elote, misir is served with salt and spices (though there is no butter). This was absolutely one of the most popular street foods, and is surprisingly tasty and filling.

Misir / Kestane Cart in Istanbul

Misir / Kestane Cart in Istanbul

Kestane – Delicious roast chestnuts often sold alongside corn, or alone after corn has gone out of season. Chestnuts are a popular fall food throughout Europe, as we saw in Lisbon, and are a great warm-up in chilly weather.
Simit – One of the many ring-shaped carb-y options available as street food in Istanbul, simit is a savory bagel-esque bread ring covered in sesame seeds. For breakfast simit, is often accompanied with yogurt and jam.
Açma – This similar to Simit, but is sweet and fried. Think of a Turkish doughnut.

Halka Tatlisi Istanbul Cart

Halka Tatlisi cart in Istabul

Halka Tatlisi – If Açma is not sweet enough for you, you graduate to the Turkish churro: Halka Tatlisi. This street food staple consists of fried dough with a glossy sugar glaze. For the sweet tooth only.
Dondurma – Turkish ice cream – which has a much denser, pliable consistency. Half the fun is watching the ice cream cone being prepared.
Pide and Lahmacun – Thin flatbreads topped with cheese and/or meat, perfect if you are feeling like more of a meal. There are also full restaurants dedicated to these foods, though you can get them on the street.
Mussels – Down by the docks we also saw buckets of Mussels for sale (and ready consumption). This particular street food we did not partake in, but we were just about the only ones. We imagine the high turnover keeps everything pretty fresh.

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Picoleishion: Celebrity Popsicle Seller of Itaparica

brazilIn our travels we met perhaps the most amazing food cart purveyor in all of Brazil, nay, Latin America! His name is Picoleishion, and he is a one-man show based in the town of Itaparica, on the northern tip of the island of the same name. He sells picole, which is simply Portuguese for “popsicle” but he isn’t a normal popsicle seller. Picoleishion is readily identified by his gigantic sombrero, frenetic dance moves and the fact that his popsicle cart is actually a giant boombox blaring Axé hits like “Billie Jean” by Magary Lord. Check him out in action (and again). The Praia do Forte in Itaparica is idyllic and quiet, and Picoleishion is hard to ignore as he rolls across the beach blaring his tunes. Over the course of one beach day we sampled 4 picoles – Mangabation (Mango), Limation (Lime), Chocolation (Chocolate), and Amendoimshion (“Peanut” was basically a peanut butter popsicle –cool! que legal!). Picoleishion is definitely a charismatic guy – and had beachgoers dancing and posing for pictures, so it is no surprise to us that he is a minor celebrity and has made an appearance on the Jô Soares show, a Letterman-type talk show in Brazil (at the start of the clip below). We love you Picoleishion! Adorei Picoleishon!

 

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An Encyclopedia of Street Food Around the World

Street Food Encyclopedia

The Chicago Reader had a recent post about a comprehensive street food encyclopedia, Street Food Around the World, and we are completely intrigued. We live for street food, from Acaraje to Sfincione. This hefty book covers street food from all around the world, and includes history and cultural commentary as well. Is this our perfect coffee table book?

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iNG Restaurant Street Food Menu Photos

Back in August we talked about the upcoming Global Street food menu at iNG. Well it’s here, and Serious Eats: Chicago got a first look. Judging by their pictures alone, the menu looks pretty impressive. We are especially intrigued by the deconstructed cannoli and churros. The menu is limited time only, so get it while you can.

Falafel at iNG restaurant, via Serious Eats

Falafel at iNG restaurant, via Serious Eats

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Jean-François Mallet’s “Take Away”: Global street food photography

French photographer Jean-François Mallet has a lovely (somewhat) new book called “Take Away” which is an amazing chronicle of street food sellers and customers from all over the world. We were intrigued by his pictures of both familiar and new takes on street food. You can check out some more of Mallet’s food and travel photography on his portfolio site.

A mobile bread vendor in Beirut, Lebanon

A mobile bread vendor in Beirut, Lebanon by Jean-François Mallet

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International Street Food Menu at Chicago’s iNG

One of our favorite dining experiences in the US was the Thai menu at Next, which was heavily influenced by the country’s superb street food. We recently learned of the new menu at Homaro Cantu’s restaurant iNG (951 W Fulton Market), which is a mash-up of elevated global street foods. The 8-course menu ($105) includes street food favorites like falafel, Korean BBQ, Tacos, Sno-Cones, and more. You can check out the complete menu on iNG’s website [pdf]. None of the interpretations are literal – check out this deconstructed riff on falafel – with pureed eggplant, Ethiopian Awaze, and a yogurt mint sauce. It’s only open for two months – so check it out soon!

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A Visit to “Delícias do Porto” Street Food Market in Salvador da Bahia

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July 2nd (Dois de Julho) is celebrated as Independence Day in Salvador da Bahia, and was considered the definitive end of Portuguese rule in 1823, so it’s the perfect day to celebrate Bahian food! Bahia has great street food, and you can find wonderful Acarajé on nearly any corner, so what could be better than an Acarajé stand surrounded by tons of other great eats? On Friday evenings during the summer (December – April in the southern hemisphere) there is a great street market put on by the Instituto Mauá in the neighborhood of Porto da Barra in Salvador called “Delícias do Porto (Delicacies of the Port)” Though the summer is now over in Brazil, it appears to be a yearly event, so check back for further updates. We highly recommended this fair for its variety, and for bringing a little culinary nightlife to the Porto da Barra area, which can feel empty during the evening hours.

???????????????????????????????You can recognize the market by its characteristic yellow booths, which seem to pop up out of nowhere on Fridays. In addition to food, there are also artisans selling traditional crafts as well as jewelry, clothes and other items. However, of course for us, the draw was the food! There was all sorts of Bahian food for sale: street favorites like BeijusAbará, Queijo coalho, Acarajé – and even some things less commonly found in street stalls – Sarapatel, Bolo de Aipim and Xinxim. In between all of the stalls is a large, open seating area, so eating your food at a leisurely pace is encouraged.

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The Xinxim (whick we had before, but in reference to a VERY different dish) was made of ground nuts, dendê (palm) oil, coconut milk, okra and shrimp. Though perhaps not the most visually appealing dish, we loved the unusual combination of savory flavors. Don’t forget to add the hot sauce and dried shrimp!
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Of course no outdoor market in Bahia would be complete without Acarajé – the trusty black-eyed pea fritter that is pure “Bahia.” This one was from Dona Emilia (whose booth is there even when the whole fair is not), and was cooked fresh to order. Everything at the fair was very reasonably priced, and we couldn’t think of a better way to spend a balmy evening – watching the sunset and washing down our Acarajé with some Guaraná soda in hand.

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Real Sicilian Pizza: Sfincione in Palermo

SicilySfincione is traditional Sicilian pizza which is baked in large squares and is often served by cutting slices with scissors (our favorite part). Sfincione is akin to a thick foccacia bread topped with tomato sauce and (traditionally) anchovies and onions, and maybe some cheese, though definitely not as much as an American pizza. More exotic toppings are not an option. Sfincione originated in Sicily, and was the primary type of pizza on the island until the 1860s. While we were in Sicily, especially Palermo, we partook in many slices from street sellers known as sfinciunaros. In addition to being a street snack throughout Sicily, sfincione is also available in many restaurants and bakeries throughout Sicily and even Rome. Serious Eats has a Sfincione recipe that has been declared to be “spot on.” Looks like we’ll have to try making it this Christmas season, when it is traditionally consumed (though it is definitely a year-round food).

Sincione

Cross Section of Sfincione by Scott Wiener

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FIFA, McDonald’s, and the fight for acarajé in Bahia

brazilWhile we are in Salvador partaking in the city’s extensive acarajé offerings, visitors to Salvador for next year’s FIFA World Cup (possibly us!) will not have such an opportunity. For a series of complex reasons outlined by Jamie Anderson on her blog about life and culture in Salvador, the sale of acarajé will be banned within two kilometers of the refurbished Estadio Fonte Nova, the site of all the World Cup games here. Instead, McDonald’s – a major World Cup sponsor – will have full rights to all food distribution. As such, Bahia’s main street food – a major source of income for locals, and an integral part of the experience of Salvador – will be banned in favor of an American fast food establishment. Coca Cola’s recent billboard in support of baianas and acarajé (seen below) is a great commentary on the issue: Coca Cola claims it is working to “preserve this culture,” but what does it mean that a large corporate entity is working to preserve a culture of Afro-Brazilian street food? We’d like to think that acarajé is doing well otherwise, and will do even better if allowed to continue on its own terms.

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Needless to say, we at ETW do not support the move, and you can do the same: sign the petition at Change.org in support of baianas’ right to sell acarajé during the World Cup.

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Pastry Post-Doc in Brazil: Cuscuz

brazilWe were intrigued when we saw a food cart on our street in Rio selling “Cuscuz.” Cous cous, as it is known in English, is very popular in Brazil, due to the large amount of middle-eastern immigrants to Brazil. There are restaurants selling savory cuscuz throughout Brazil (especially in São Paulo) but this version with the same name is something different. More precisely, it is known as cuscuz Carioca or cuscuz tapioca. This sweet version consists of sticky tapioca, condensed milk and a topping of shaved coconut. For a mere R$ 1.50  (about $0.75), you get a little plastic box of cuscuz to go. Now, it is not the most attractive dish, but it sure is tasty, and perfect for an afternoon snack. Fans of tapioca pudding will go gaga for this Brazilian treat, one of the most emblematic Carioca street dishes. Here is an exceedingly simple recipe for cuscuz tapioca in Portuguese. Though you can make it at home, if you are in Rio you will never have to!

Cuscuz

Cuscuz from Rio de Janeiro

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Top Food Trucks in London

It is no secret that we are mad about food carts, and we consider them to be one of America’s most important exports. Food cart culture has spread to Paris in recent years and has taken root in London. It is worth noting that food “cart” and food “truck” have very different connotations in British English, with food carts having a somewhat dubious reputation. Not to fear though, high quality and innovative food trucks are on the rise in London, right on the heels of booming food truck culture in the US. The variety of London food truck is admirably vast and street foodies can choose from gourmet burgers, curry, chocolate, Vietnamese, and Mexican, among others.

The Luardos Food Truck in London

The Guardian has a list of food trucks picks in London , along with some mouth-watering recipes from each (we are especially digging the Carnitas recipe from Luardos). Migrationology has another round of 6 picks, including meatballs and hotdogs (sounds a little familiar to Chicago, no?). Another truck that found its way onto nearly all of the lists was Crêperie Nicholas, a fan-favorite for crêpes, served out of a restored 1965 Citroën truck. Southern food has also made its way to London, and the Pitt Cue Co. truck even offers pulled pork. This extremely important development means we could move to London easily, should the need arise. Most intriguingly we are excited to note the appearance of the HMS Flake 99, an ice cream truck that doubles as a BOAT (see below). For the latest in London street food developments, you can keep up with the Eat.st site.

HMS Flake 99 photo by Eater

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A guide to street food in Sicily

After our visit to Next Sicily we have Sicily on the brain. We visited the real Sicily last fall on our honeymoon, and we loved the food there (no surprise). What we especially loved was the abundance of cheap, tasty street food. Palermo in particular is a street food mecca – with fast and delicious morsels being sold from stands or tiny storefronts on almost all corners. When we were headed to Palermo we shortlisted a few types of street food we had to try while there, and fortunately we were not disappointed. We set out right away to start sampling street food, and made a beeline to the markets, where street food is king. Below are the favorite street foods we sampled (and one even we were not brave enough to try). So let’s go to Palermo….

Panelle – Panelle is a riff on a falafel – and is composed of chickpea flour fried up on a hot griddle. It is then served in a pita or eaten alone. One wouldn’t think that this carby concoction would work, but it is actually quite delicious (fans of falafel will approve). We had some handmade Panelle griddled up for us at the bustling Ballarò market, a cool food market with a lot of awesome African stalls.
Crocchè – We dodn’t even realize our Panelle would be coming with a special topping – crocchè- a little fritter made of mashed potatoes and parsley. Think of them as the most delicious tater tots you will ever have. The crocchè are the top layer of the snack below, and panelle is the bottom layer. Don’t forget to add a squeeze of lemon to help cut through all of the starch.


Arancini – The humble arancine is basically a fried dough ball filled with cheese and meat. However, the beauty of the arancine lies in its proper execution. If done wrong, an arancine is a gelatinous mealy blob that settles into a leaden ball in the pit of your stomach. Yes, we’ve had a few of those. However – when done right – the arancine is a warm gooey mess that does not leave you feeling like you ate a cannonball. Let’s just say – we had both varieties for Arancini on our Sicilian adventure. Arancine were found in pretty much every snack shop in Palermo, and one, Bar Touring, even specializes in giant arancini.


Pane cà meusa – Pane cà meusa is for braver stomachs than ours, and this street food dish consists of boiled calf spleen served in a roll. When happening across a pane cà meusa stall, you will usually find a hot bubbling cauldron of spleen. While its sheer popularity leads us to believe it is probably decently good, we would much rather take gelato in a brioche, thanks.
Gelato con Brioche – Saving the best for last, Gelato con Brioche is perhaps the most epic street food we have ever encountered in all of our travels. It is exactly what it sounds like, amazing gelato stuffed in a split brioche roll. Think of it as an ice cream cone carried to its next logical extreme. The first gelato in brioche we had even helped us get over the gruesome sites at the Convento dos Capuccinos in Palermo.

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Great Non-Taco Items at Maxwell Street Market

Huitlacoche Quesadilla at Rubi’s – our favorite! (via SeriousEats)

It’s no secret that we love Maxwell Street Market for its awesome array of street food, so we were happy to see this Serious Eats Chicago profile on the some great things to eat at the Market (beyond the taco).

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